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Characteristics

  • Feral cats are fiercely independent and survive (but may not thrive) without the help of humans. They avoid people and hide, back away, or flee when they spot humans. Lack of immunization, parasite control, adequate nutrition, and hygiene put feral cats at risk of many life-threatening problems. TNR (Trap, Neuter, and Release) programs are the hallmark of controlling feral cat populations.

  • Mynah birds are best known for their ability to talk and mimic sounds. They are lively, social birds and have wonderfully outgoing personalities. A young, hand-raised mynah will be easier to tame and train compared to a wild, colony, or parent-raised bird. As with all pets, mynah birds require regular, routine veterinary checkups.

  • Ferrets are generally good-natured, inquisitive, playful animals that enjoy the company of humans. They can make great pets! This handout provides some basic facts about ferrets and what you need to know about keeping one as a pet.

  • The domestic pigeon includes over 300 breeds, all descending from the rock dove. They originated in Eurasia, but are now found all over the world. They come in many color combinations and their plumage can include anything from feathered feet to crested, maned, or hooded heads. They are generally hardy birds that are easy to tame and care for. As with any pet, pigeons require regular, routine veterinary health checkups.

  • The pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene, if mutated, can contribute to increased body fat and body weight and increased food motivation in affected dogs. At this time, this gene mutation has only been found in the Labrador Retriever and Flat-coated Retriever and affects the majority of those working as service dogs. This handout explains how the POMC gene mutation was discovered, how it impacts affected dogs, and how you can support your dog if affected.

  • Many dogs love to get out to socialize and exercise with their canine friends and dog parks are their go-to spots for getting together. Proper etiquette, from both you and your pup, will allow everyone to enjoy the park safely and courteously.

  • Psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD) is a serious condition in parrot species for which there is no cure. The highly contagious virus attacks fast-growing epithelial cells, commonly causing visibly abnormal formations of the beak and/or feather follicles. The clinical signs vary depending on the species of bird and the age at which it was infected. Diagnostic testing is available and precautions must be taken when purchasing a new bird.

  • A recessed vulva, also referred to as a juvenile or hypoplastic vulva, is a conformational issue that occurs in female dogs. In this condition, the vulva is recessed within, or partially hidden by, surrounding folds of skin. Some dogs might have a recessed vulva for their entire life without ever experiencing any visible effects. In other dogs, however, a recessed vulva can predispose them to vaginitis and/or urinary tract infections. Depending on the severity of your dog’s clinical signs, medical or surgical options may be used to treat this condition.

  • At certain times of the year, birds are under the powerful influence of sex hormones and will behave instinctively in distinct ways that you may not have witnessed before. Humans may cause frustration or confusion in their birds with what may be our inappropriate responses to their sexual behaviors. This handout describes several of these behaviors in birds and how to prevent or manage them.

  • Sugar gliders are small, nocturnal mammals with a social and curious nature. They are also marsupials, meaning they possess a pouch in which the female raises her young. This handout describes the sugar glider's physical and behavioral characteristics along with recommendations for choosing one to be your pet.